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Author Topic: How can I get some help  (Read 2185 times)
baboo
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« on: April 26, 2007, 17:10:02 PM »

I want to setup network interfaces from cli. Where does the config scripts reside (e.g., ifcfg-eth0)?

What is the command to restart network services and dhcp? (e.g., /etc/init.d/network restart)

I have posted this under Config issues with Pardus but not answers. I logged in several days in a row to irc chat and asked but no one responds. I like Pardus but I've noticed serveral postings complaining that they can't get answers and are giving up.

Please help as I want to stay with Pardus but if I can not get a simple question like this answered then I guess its back to Sabayon.

thanks
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Pardoes
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« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2007, 23:14:27 PM »

I want to setup network interfaces from cli. Where does the config scripts reside (e.g., ifcfg-eth0)?

What is the command to restart network services and dhcp? (e.g., /etc/init.d/network restart)

I have posted this under Config issues with Pardus but not answers. I logged in several days in a row to irc chat and asked but no one responds. I like Pardus but I've noticed serveral postings complaining that they can't get answers and are giving up.

Please help as I want to stay with Pardus but if I can not get a simple question like this answered then I guess its back to Sabayon.

thanks

I do not know what cli means, but have you look in Pisi
for CLI or DHCP ?. There you can find  these programs.
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Jan Gnodde
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2007, 02:34:04 AM »

I do not know what cli means,

CLI = command line interface

Jan.
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Talisien
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2007, 08:41:21 AM »

Dear Jan,

You asked about where you can find ifcfg file it resides in /sbin/. If You are looking for special files You can manage like this:

look in PISI if you have installed slocate. If not install. After that go to Your console and type sudo updatedb. Now it takes a bit time. (What happens? updatedb will generate a DB-file wich includes surchpath of all files on Your computer) After that You can start surch like this:
You are looking for ifcfg so type : locate ifcfg. You also can use wildcarts: locate ifc*. The result wil be: /sbin/ifcg

Greatings

Wolfgang

P.S. Once a day it is good to update the DB-file by sudo updatedb because of the new files You add on Your computer by store.
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hal8000
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2007, 10:19:40 AM »

CLI was used in terms of the old Amiga computer and sometimes referred to in windows.

In Unix and linux we use a terminal and our command line is called the "shell", so in future you can ask for shell commands, from the console, or from a terminal (but we all know what you mean Smiley  )


You first need to know if your network interface has been recognised so you will type
as root:
ifconfig

You will see info for loopback and hopefully the first network interface, which will be called eth0.

If for example you want to statically assign an address of 192.168.0.20 to your network card you would use

ifconfig eth0 192.168.0.20 netmask 255.255.255.0

Check with ifconfig or ifconfig eth0

This would set up your  NIC correctly.
Now you would have to add a default gatway, this is the address of your router,
this may be 192.168.0.1

route add default gw 192.168.0.1

you can check its been set with

route -n

Finally you need to set your ISP, DNS servers in /etc/resolv.conf   If the DNS servers are programmed into your router then you simply point resolv.conf at your router

The contents of file /etc/resolv.conf would look like

nameserver 192.168.0.20


You can check if things are working by first pinging the gateway, then a wan address
e.g.
ping -c4 192.168.0.20
ping -c4 www.google.com

Hope that helps.
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baboo
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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2007, 15:25:33 PM »

I have been away on a trip so I appologize for the delay in responding to posts.

Thank you for all the replys. However, the replys are all wrong. I gave examples of what I was looking for.

I've been using Linux for several years and know how to configure a network interface and setup routing. That is not what I asked. Also, in Linux we do refer to the terminal shell as cli or command line interface. Okay, now let me restate what I need.

When manually configuring a network interface you can create a script that defines how that interface is going to work, i.e., start on boot. What I have been having trouble with is I can't seem to find those scripts. In other distros they reside in /etc/init.d/network-devices/ifcfg-eth0 or ifcfg-ethX or whatever. Where are they in Pardus?

Also, when I restart the network in other distros I might type the following command: /etc/init.d/network restart. What is similiar command in Pardus?

What I find troubling with Pardus is not the distro but a lack of information on basics. Many posts do not get answered, especially english ones. I would like to support Pardus but it concerns me when I can't get such a basic question answered.

again thanks to those who replied
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idevil
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« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2007, 15:57:03 PM »

Hi baboo,
I only started using Pardus yesterday but I've read all the articles on the website (the ones in english, at least). I may not be 100% correct but I'll explain things as I understand them.
The problem is that Pardus manages services in a completely different way to the SysV init scritps that you're familiar with. The fact is the scripts you're looking for don't really exist. Network interfaces - just like all other services - are configured by Comar at the request of the Network Manger or Network Applet. These request are made through Comar's python bindings. While writing a comman line tool should be no more  difficult than a GUI one, I can't find one in the standard installation, so I can only assume that there isn't one.
I realise that's not exactly the answer you were hpoing for but I hope it helps in some way.

Alex
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Spoonman
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« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2007, 03:54:31 AM »

CLI was used in terms of the old Amiga computer and sometimes referred to in windows.

Just to be clear, CLI was a term used by 'nix admins back in 1986 when I started in this field.  It's been borrowed by other OSes and folks, sure, but it's not a new idea. Smiley
 
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