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Author Topic: Your Duty As A Free OS Connoisseur  (Read 1177 times)
Mhmrcs
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« on: October 25, 2008, 22:22:53 PM »

While I think Pardus is personally perfect for me, I think there are certain distributions that every linux user should try out, simply for the experience.

OpenSolaris - It has its good sides (NVIDIA preinstalled on first startup) and bad sides (poor process management), and its worth explorer the open source alternative to the titan of Sun Microsystems - Solaris. Its completely compatible to Linux programs without need for an emulator.

PC-BSD - Impressive GUI, a more system demanding distribution based on... you guessed it, BSD. Like Pardus it reinvented the wheel, and made .pbi the default package manager and is unique in that aspect. Its the strongest contenter to the "user-friendly" OS's made by Apple and Microsoft.
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Pepello
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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2009, 22:11:20 PM »

I am very willing to test pc-bsd, but for some reason it doesn't even start installing on my machine :-( Thus i'm trying it on a virtual machine, but its programm management really intrigues me :-(
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Llama
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2009, 10:16:54 AM »

Thus i'm trying it on a virtual machine, but its programm management really intrigues me :-(
BSD's system of package building/package management is officially called ports system. You may not believe me, but the Pardus package delivery system is also ports system. Never mind they have another name for it; never mind that documentation is fragmentary; it's the real thing just the same, with all its benefits. One of the reasons I pay close attention to Pardus Smiley .
« Last Edit: April 06, 2009, 10:19:17 AM by Llama » Logged
PhiX
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2009, 12:26:17 PM »

«Programs created for PC-BSD should be entirely self-contained, including both libraries and any binary files required for the program to function. This will allow users to install/remove programs at will, without any worry about dependency issues or having to update system files. This also promotes longevity for programs, since they will not become obsolete with each system upgrade.»

Source : http://faqs.pcbsd.org/index.php?action=artikel&cat=18&id=321&artlang=en

This isn't the way pisi packages work. So, what makes you think PARDUS pisi is similar to BSD ports ?
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2009, 14:58:51 PM »

This isn't the way pisi packages work. So, what makes you think PARDUS pisi is similar to BSD ports ?
Sure. I didn't mean PC-BSD *.pbi packages. I meant the mainstream BSD ports system. A port is essentially a script complete with a link to the sources; it also contains build and install options/instructions. Generally speaking, running a port may result in a direct install or in the building of a package; the latter is much more convenient. Tell me that pspec.xml and actions.py files don't make up a port.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2009, 15:39:19 PM by Llama » Logged
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