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Author Topic: Partitioning Is The Most Important Part Of Installation  (Read 1006 times)
Mhmrcs
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« on: October 25, 2008, 22:31:21 PM »

I'm sure a lot of you do this already, and this may sound like advice from a newbie, but its important.

> You're advised to install your distribution (/ [root]) in a partition of its own, roughly 15 - 30 GiB should be reserved for it, in case your system crashes, your personal files will remain intact.
> SWAP should be twice the size of your RAM
> Your should split the remaing space between two partitions, one (/home) being your default home directory, and the other a backup to /home so that files can be recovered in case of an incident or if you need an older version of a file you editted.
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PhiX
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 23:27:19 PM »

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You're advised to install your distribution (/ [root]) in a partition of its own, roughly 15 - 30 GiB should be reserved for it, in case your system crashes, your personal files will remain intact.

I use 5 Gb for the root partition. All the programs I need are installed. That leaves me over 900 Mb free for additional programs additional and enough room for updates (pisi packages are downloaded in /var/cache/pisi/packages).

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SWAP should be twice the size of your RAM

This rule is not relevant anymore, now that we have several gigabite of RAM on the average PC. For example, I have 2 Gb of RAM and no swap partition at all. Swapping slows down the PC, because data transfer is slower on the harddrive than on the RAM.

Quote
Your should split the remaing space between two partitions, one (/home) being your default home directory, and the other a backup to /home so that files can be recovered in case of an incident or if you need an older version of a file you editted.

This seems a bit complex and resssource consuming (automatic synchronisation) to me.
Are you talking about RAID ?
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Mhmrcs
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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 23:39:48 PM »

I understand completely from a minimalist standpoint, but updates, heavy-duty games, development software really takes over room, so I gave generic instructions. Also, the rule applies to most distributions, (Ubuntu can swell to over 20 GiB very easily etc) in case users switch from Pardus.

With the onslaught of netbooks, this will be helpful to many people, but thanks, I didn't know more powerful computers don't need swap space - thanks Smiley

No, simply installing a backup program to synchronize the two partitions, in addition to the seperate of OS and /home directory, the third protective measure of making a copy of /home will make your computer ultra-safe.
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