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Author Topic: fastest setup?  (Read 2003 times)
owiknowi
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« on: January 05, 2012, 19:38:14 PM »

just for testing purposes and for those who dare:
what is the fastest setup, partitioning and file system, for a pc with single boot penguin, known to mankind? Grin
i'm tinkering with an pretty simple notebook and like to see how fast i can let it run (not fly, since penguins are known to have no interest to get airborne...)

some specs:
asus ul 50a, intel u7300 @ 1.30ghz, 4gb, 500gb @ 5400rpm

current partitioning (all primary and rounded up to cylinders):
sda1: 4gb (swap)
sda2: 60gb (/), ext4
sda3: 400gb (/home), ext4

once the penguin is installed, some neat system adjustments can be found here and, of course, i uninstall evrything i don't want till it breaks  Wink
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Anglo
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« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2012, 09:48:27 AM »


what is the fastest setup, partitioning and file system, for a pc with single boot penguin, known to mankind? Grin

A rescue system (based on busybox ) in ram , stored on a sshd (since you ARE tinkering...........)
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owiknowi
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2012, 12:46:50 PM »

A rescue system (based on busybox ) in ram , stored on a sshd (since you ARE tinkering...........)

not quite according to my existing configuration, but a nice thought nevertheless. but i forgot to mention that it should run a regular penguin.
now i'm trying the following (with the hw configuration as provided):

sda1: 1gb (/boot), ext4
sda2: 40gb (/), ext4
sda3; 400gb (/home), xfs (excellent for larger files, bu not for smaller ones. but what are small and big files according to penguins?)
sda4: 4gb (swap) (with swapiness set to max. 10%, which tells the penguin only to use hdd swap when ram is less then 10%) Grin

regards,
owiknowi, mad penguin
« Last Edit: January 06, 2012, 12:49:47 PM by owiknowi » Logged
atolboo
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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2012, 14:14:35 PM »

Why is the reason of the size of
sda2: 40gb (/), ext4
Huh?
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owiknowi
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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2012, 14:36:20 PM »

a separate / partition needs a bit of space for e.g. /tmp and e.g. /var, both containing sometimes lots of (smaller) temporary files.
and ext4 is a very good generic or overall file system, but not the best when it comes to large files, afaik.

so i made a separate /home partition with the xfs file system because of the use of files from 300mb up to 10gb.

but, as said before: it's just to see what happens with different partitioning schemes and file systems (most info i get from arch linux, from canada   )
« Last Edit: January 06, 2012, 14:39:54 PM by owiknowi » Logged
Anglo
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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2012, 17:15:05 PM »

What kind of a testing load are you using ( seems a little slow for video transcoding ) ?
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owiknowi
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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2012, 17:55:56 PM »

well, actual all kinds of things: work with databases (e.g. qgis), cad, video & audio editing/converting/transcoding, image editing, dtp, multi tasking, and what not.

the used hardware is not all that well suited for those things, so the actual results (content) are not all that interesting. it's just to see what happens with different configurations and penguins:
how fast and stable can one make a pretty generic notebook using penguins?

till now only high end notebooks can keep up with desktops (like the switchable graphics) or with specialized software.
but alas: they all come with that flag thingy.

more ram and a nice ssd surely would speed things up, but there's that thing with a $ or € sign...
if i find any interesting results i'll post them here but even better: i'll give them to the open pc project, who are developing an open pc notebook  Grin

and, in the bargain, show some people how fast and stable a well configured penguin notebook can be.
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Anglo
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« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2012, 18:21:15 PM »

I look forward to the results
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owiknowi
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2012, 16:27:59 PM »

alas, not all that much news...

after trying some different configurations, partitioning and file systems, personally i prefer the following:
sda1 ext4 for /
sda2 xfs for /home (i use files starting at about 400mb. when using mostly smaller files you might as well use ext4)
sda3 swap space (4gb with swappiness set to 8%)

i also tried this configuration with a seperate /boot partition, but couldn't notice much/any benefits so far.
a seperate /temp makes a (little) difference since all temporary files are no linger stored within the system (/) partition, just like your personal files shouln't...  Wink

note: even on a 8gb ram computer i do create a 4gb swap partition. the system seems to be less stable without.
this is a bit odd since 8gb is hardly ever used).
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 17:08:30 PM by owiknowi » Logged
Anglo
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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2012, 16:41:57 PM »


With that much memory, have you considered using a ram based file system? I would think loading the operating system to memory would make it as fast as anything possible.Or just a big ramdisk ,possibly, if you're using huge data.

Either case , the inital loading would be the longest of times , but assuming you use it for a extended time , would be as fast as it ever gets.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 16:44:12 PM by Anglo » Logged
owiknowi
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« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2012, 17:08:14 PM »

@anglo
you're right, and using a ssd would also make things considerably faster.
i'm just trying to get the best of both worlds for an 'ancient' pc: less writing actions to the old hdd, and also keeping as much as possible free ram.
especially with heavy duty applications like some g.i.s., video editing and 3d, they can require a lot of ram during some data processing.

so, a ssd based computer with a very fast bus and fast ram, would be a good way to deal with those professional applications.

but to keep costs down, and since the most of us still use the 'ancient' pc's, i try to see what can be done using different  partitioning schemes (as less as possible write actions into the file system) and different types of file systems.
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Anglo
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« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2012, 17:14:12 PM »

I'm looking at a g4 powerbook, TELL me about ancient.
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owiknowi
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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2012, 17:49:00 PM »

ah, them apples... i feel for you, i do... just wait what the open-pc project will do, laptop wise that is.
and if you can't wait that long, take a look at these penguins  Grin
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Anglo
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« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2012, 20:09:11 PM »

Very nice , and some new names in the business,........however,
 To the knowing , the ancients are still capable , and a portable laptop will best serve my needs and I have too many desktops right now.
And like some others I ( Tongue ) I prefer to keep costs down.....
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 20:14:42 PM by Anglo » Logged
kalwisti
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« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2012, 05:06:09 AM »

I'm looking at a g4 powerbook, TELL me about ancient.

@Anglo,

In case you haven't heard about Jeroen Diederen's Linux MintPPC, I thought I'd mention it:

http://mintppc.org/about

We have an old G4 PowerBook (with OS X 10.4 Tiger on it, which is now unsupported). I've read positive reviews of MintPPC and am seriously considering installing it on the laptop.
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